The White Pines cutting ceremony at The Whidbey Institute was a special day for me. About a month before this day took place, I was attending the Whidbey Island Bioneers. The Bioneers event was the first time I visited Whidbey Island. I found it to be a truly special place as there is something here that is generative, calm, and restful. It's a great place not only to relax and reflect, but to grow, build appreciations, and recharge.

During one of the sessions, Gabriel Shirley recognized that two of the White Pines, due to disease, were becoming a liability and would be cut down in December. The Pines were originally planted by the founders of the Institute, and have thus been part of this environment and community, over 100 years ago when it first began.

Before making any images of these trees, I stood next to them for about half an hour, thinking about all of the life that has been affected by their presence, from the people who come in contact with them, to all of the insects, birds, disease, and other organisms that have found some sort of haven here. Only after I felt a deeper sense of meaning and appreciation did I unpack the Mamiya RB67, load up the film, and begin photographing. I chose this camera and classic film stock (Kodak Tri-X 400) because that's what would have been used when these trees were in their prime.

Image made with Mamiya RB67 with Kodak Tri-X 400 and developed in Kodak HC-110.

 Image made with Mamiya RB67 with Kodak Tri-X 400 and developed in Kodak HC-110.

Image made with Mamiya RB67 with Kodak Tri-X 400 and developed in Kodak HC-110.

 Image made with Mamiya RB67 with Kodak Tri-X 400 and developed in Kodak HC-110.

Image made with Mamiya RB67 with Kodak Tri-X 400 and developed in Kodak HC-110.

 Image made with Mamiya RB67 with Kodak Tri-X 400 and developed in Kodak HC-110.

Image made with Mamiya RB67 with Kodak Tri-X 400 and developed in Kodak HC-110.